After the death of Elizabeth II, Antigua and Barbuda takes the first step to break with the British Crown

After the death of Elizabeth II, Antigua and Barbuda takes the first step to break with the British Crown

LONDON.– After the death of queen elizabeth iiThe group of 14 Commonwealth of Nations realms (Commonwealth) faces an uncertain future after some of its constituent nations hinted at the possibility of raise a republican future, outside the margins of the British monarchy.

Founded in late 1926, the Commonwealth seeks to promote political and economic cooperation although, since the middle of the last century, membership has not meant that member countries must pay homage to the British monarch.

Although under the long reign of Elizabeth II the organization seemed to enjoy a certain stability -despite the recent break-up of Barbados-, after the death of the monarch some nations have opened up the possibility of leaving the Commonwealth.

On Sunday, the Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda has announced that the Caribbean country may hold a referendum to decide whether or not to become a presidential republicwhich would cause the recently proclaimed King Carlos III to cease to be its head of state.

Gaston Browne, Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda.Flickr

Gaston Browne commented that the vote would be expected in three years and added that does not involve an “act of hostility” against the British crown. The politician made the comments after confirm the new monarch as sovereign of the West Indian nation.

Browne added that he intended to present the referendum if he was re-elected next year. Although he hopes to win this election – his party holds 15 of the 17 seats in the House of Representatives – he admitted that among citizens there was no overwhelming demand to change the political system.

“I think most people haven’t even bothered to think about it.“, said ITVNews.

Joining Antigua and Barbuda, Prime Minister of New Zealand, Jacinda Ardern, left the door open to the ocean country to disengage from the British monarchy and, although he predicted that it will not be “a short-term measure”, and even on Friday he announced that the new British monarch Charles III would be New Zealand’s new head of state, he believes he will see this change before he dies.

“I have explained my point of view several times. I think (independence) is where New Zealand is going in the future. It’s likely to happen in my lifetime, but don’t view it as a short-term measure or anything on the short-term agenda.”Arden said.

For his part, the Australian Prime Minister, Anthony Albanese, leader of another of the great countries that make up the Commonwealth, acknowledged that “Now is not the time to talk” concerning the possible departure of the group, and recalled that Elizabeth II has always “respected the self-determination of the Australian people”.

during this time at Canadaeven if demographic studies show a certain desire for independence, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau seems to be keeping this issue off his political agendaespecially since, At the constitutional level, to approve any change in this regard, the unanimous support of all the provincial legislatures is required.

More determined seem to be the authorities of Jamaicabecause although in recent days they have not spoken of it, There is a historic desire for independence on the Caribbean island acknowledged by Prime Minister Andrew Holnesslast March.

In the same vein, in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines there have been protests in the past against the monarchy and its head of government, Ralph Gonsalves, who proposed in July to hold a referendum, although he acknowledged that this could only be achieved after agreement with the supporters to remain part of the Commonwealth.

Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, is greeted by Sandra Mason, Governor General of Barbados, upon his arrival at Bridgetown Airport on November 28, 2021 in Bridgetown, Barbados.
Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, is greeted by Sandra Mason, Governor General of Barbados, upon his arrival at Bridgetown Airport on November 28, 2021 in Bridgetown, Barbados.JEFF J MITCHELL – GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA

On another step are countries such as Bahamas, Belize, Grenada, Saint Kitts and Nevis or Saint Luciawhere there are also independence movements although they have not been reactivated lately, not even after the death of Isabella II.

A) Yes, the future of the Commonwealth appears as one of the great challenges that Carlos III will have to face, who, after years of waiting to take the baton, already in his first speech as king, endorsed his mother’s “deep personal commitment” with the group of nations.

dpa agency

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