"Moon Knight": Oscar Isaac in deep identity crisis and surrounded by a lot of action

“Moon Knight”: Oscar Isaac in deep identity crisis and surrounded by a lot of action

“Moon Knight” premiered this week. (Disney/Marvel)

Most interesting character wonder which started with titles in serial format for Disney+ It’s that they brought in the “secondaries” of the films to open up the field of action even more and enter minimal stories to then connect them in what is now the multiverse (central axis of phase 4). There was also a small crisis opportunity, as they sped up the production process of the same by taking advantage of people being home all day. With Moon Knight this all breaks and opens a new stage in Marvel: introducing characters to the series and then adding them to the payroll of the Avengers (or the cinematic universe, something like a promotion). But it’s not going to be that easy because he’s not an easy character.

Steven Grant, played by oscar isaac, is a decent and efficient employee who works in a museum gift shop. But in the same body also lives Marc Spector, an efficient former mercenary and body-ship of an Egyptian god who seeks to imbue the world with justice. They are two opposite halves fighting for control, but also complementary. One is brain, peace and innocence, the other is strength, chaos and war. But that will be discovered in a few chapters.

The protagonist of this story is Steven Grant, played by Oscar Isaac. (Gabor Kotschy/Disney Plus)

After seeing the four episodes he advanced Disney+ to the press, something is clear: the development of all the action scenes and the most superheroic part is well executed and with the added bonus of trying to understand who is in control or who is going to take control in a certain situation, since depending on who it is, Steven or Mark, the conflict will be resolved differently. The other line of conflict is the psychological drama of this character and this is where he becomes much more grown up and twisted. To this, we must add a much more interesting villain in terms of his past, his present and his business model: Arthur Harrow, played by Ethan Hawke, the leader of a cult-like group who wishes to find an artifact he imagines to be in Steven/Marc’s possession.

Oscar Isaac has nothing to prove as one of the best actors of his generation. Choose products that can be a constant challenge, from a Marvel hero to an ordinary man in the midst of a marital crisis. It includes the Hollywood game. But here he faced a greater challenge: his character has dissociative identity disorder, an exercise in developing and developing almost two identities in parallel, but to this must be added his superhero versions: the one of Mark is Moon Knightas Steven begins to develop mister night. The result is good, but sometimes with little development time, because the series must present a superior conflict surrounded by action and with a large number of elements that cause Isaac to lose, above all, Isaac’s performance.

Marc is Moon Knight, while Steven begins to develop M. Night.  (DisneyPlus)

Marc is Moon Knight, while Steven begins to develop M. Night. (DisneyPlus)

But the rest of the performances run a balance. Both the villain of falcon as Layla El-Faouly, played by Mai Calamawyensure that Isaac does not take on an overwhelming role and work, more than ever, as supporting characters, in addition to developing their own stories. F. Murray Abraham, the award-winning actor who provides the voice of Khonshu, also has his weight in the story, and his appearance works as the most mystical and interesting moment in the early chapters. It’s a small cast, beyond the various looks it has, but most Marvel series execute that dynamic. Here it also works to contain the lead role of Isaac.

On Moon Knight, the central character of this story that we will surely see again later, has a history of more than 40 years in Marvel cartoons. It is the Fist of Khonshu, the Egyptian god who shows off a new and wide thematic universe to explore and which adheres to the MCU without a concrete and concise presentation, it will only be learned along the way and literally by the beatings (of which Steven and Marc receive). And I think that was the wisest decision on the show. The discovery of this mythology, not that of the true Egyptian but that of Marvel, occurs naturally throughout the conflict. It’s not something we should take in as viewers on top of all the complexity that Isaac’s character drags along. And as we will discover with Steve (powers, other gods, and an old story with the villain), his presentation doesn’t seem that heavy.

Moon Knight has a history of over 40 years in Marvel comics.  (Wonder)

Moon Knight has a history of over 40 years in Marvel comics. (Wonder)

Moon Knight something messy begins. A first chapter without pendulum which later in chapters two and three is armed. It develops as a psychological thriller, then evolves towards horror (the most interesting aspect of the first two episodes) and ends close to the saga of The Mummy from Brendan Fraser, between adventures, humour, lots of special effects and lots of sand. Makes sense due to the locations and theme of the series, but, in this case, the hero is lost. We rarely see such an interesting design of Moon Knight and all its features. Maybe it will get better in the last two episodes.

In short, the first season (in fact the first four episodes) of Moon Knight It features interesting elements throughout. Sometimes very well executed and at others quite cluttered. Without reaching the end of the series, wonder reboots an MCU character rich with his own story, addictive for that mix of action, horror and humor, with deep conflicts and action elements that look very cute, but serve more promise of what will happen in a second season and meet him with other heroes.

Marc Spector lives in the same body as Steven Grant.  (DisneyPlus)

Marc Spector lives in the same body as Steven Grant. (DisneyPlus)

Moon Knight premiered this week on Disney+.

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