Sex toys should be used as a form of medical treatment, study finds

Sex toys should be used as a form of medical treatment, study finds

The review’s authors hope that one day doctors will prescribe sex toys as part of their standard treatment recommendations (Getty Images)

May is the masturbation month, For what the news that health experts are finally beginning to recognize the benefits of self-pleasure, especially for women, it is timely development.

Female self-pleasure has a lot to offer, but new research reveals that the use of sex toys can have benefits beyond the benefits of personal pleasure. The findings emerge after a review of existing work on the use of vibrators and their influence on women’s health and they found that if we could all learn to break the taboo, they might even be prescribed as part of a treatment plan.

“Only recently, The stigma of women using vibrators for sexual pleasure has begun to fade.” the authors wrote in Article published in the Journal of Urology of the American Urological Association. “However, carry on to be a social taboo and surrounded by anxiety despite a variety of potential health benefits from its use,” they said.

“Vibrators are not well studied and given the promising benefits demonstrated in the articles identified, further research efforts should be directed to investigate their usefulness” (Getty Images)

Regardless of the revolutions that take place between the sheets, problems related to the pelvic region are likely to remain a sensitive subject between patients and their caregivers. Next, could it be that the use of vibrators to improve health outcomes is a suggestion that should come from specialists and gynecologists. Of course, for medical professionals to approve such therapies, there must be strong scientific evidence of its benefits. The authors of the study therefore set out to find them.

In search of the benefits of vibrators, they reviewed articles from pubmed, clinicaltrials.govOvid and databases Cochrane written between their inception and July 2021. They were looking for anything related to a rich variety of keywords: “sex toy for women”, “pelvic vibrator”, “sexual stimulation vibrator”, “vaginal vibrator”, “pelvic floor vibrator” and “vibrator for incontinence”.

Your search returned 549 results, 18 of which met the criteria for your specific search objectives. They tackled issues like sexual function, pelvic floor strength, incontinence, and chronic vulvar pain known as vulvodynia (chronic, unexplained pain in the area around the opening of the vagina).

The stigma associated with using vibrators and other sex toys is beginning to fade, although for many people they are still a taboo (Getty Images)
The stigma associated with using vibrators and other sex toys is beginning to fade, although for many people they are still a taboo (Getty Images)

The promising results found in the (albeit small) sample of 18 relevant papers, according to the researchers, are indicative of the potential of vibrators as therapeutic devices. “Among the studies reviewed, vibrators were considered an accepted modality for improve a woman’s sexual experience and were positively correlated with increased sexual desire, satisfaction, and overall sexual function. they wrote. “vibration stimulation it improved pelvic floor muscle strength, vulvodynia, and improved incontinence.

While going to the pharmacy with a prescription for a vibrator can still be a perspective for the future instead of now, the study authors andThey hope that their findings will demonstrate that this is a valid avenue for future research in hopes of discovering new therapies for a variety of women’s health conditions.

“Vibrators are not well studied and given the promising benefits demonstrated in the articles identified, further research efforts should be directed to investigate their usefulness”, they concluded. “Given the potential benefits of vibrators for pelvic health, their recommendation for women should be included in our treatment arsenal for pelvic floor disorders,” they assessed.

"Medical providers, especially those in gynecology, urology, female pelvic medicine, and reconstructive surgery, need more extensive training in women's sexual health and vibrators" (Getty Pictures)
“Providers, especially those in gynecology, urology, female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery, need more extensive education about women’s sexual health and vibrators” (Getty Images )

“As a urogynecologist, I spend my time talking to women about their genital and sexual health,” said the study’s lead author, Dr. Alexandra Dubinskaya of Cedar Sinai Medical Center, in dialogue with Newsweek. He added: “It is often shared that no medical professionals have spoken to them about their sex life or their solo sexual experiences.

It is that for Dubinskaya, there is a stigma associated with masturbation and vibrators. “Vibrators reduce time to orgasm, facilitate multiple orgasms and improve sex-related distress. We know from female sexual medicine that positive sexual experiences encourage women to have sex in the future. We can conclude that vibrators can improve a woman’s sexual desire by making sexual pleasure easily accessible alone and/or with a partner,” he said.

“Care providers, especially those in gynecology, urology, female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery, they need more education about women’s sexual health and vibrators. I believe all of this is possible since we are now normalizing the discussion of women’s sexual health,” the expert concluded.

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