Tato Bores would be 95 years old: the five historical monologues still in force

Tato Bores would be 95 years old: the five historical monologues still in force

The historical actor and comedian Tato Bores would be 95 this Wednesday, April 27. And although he has not been physically present since the summer of 1996, his voice, his gaze and his always lucid description of the Argentine reality are part of the national DNA.

Son of a low-income Jewish family who lived in the heart of downtown Buenos Aires, Mauricio Borensztein was the middle brother dropped out of school before the end of high school and it immediately connected with the world of entertainment.

It started with the lower trades. He was usher at the Teatro Nacional Cervantes and conductor – as the technician who loads the instruments is called – of the orchestra directed by Luis Rolero and René Cóspito. His ability to tell jokes was noticed in time by two people who would be fundamental to his life: screenwriter Julio Porter (the creator of the nickname “Tato”) and comedian Pepe IglesiasAlso known as “Fox”who hired him in 1945 as his partner on Radio Splendid.

Tato Bores 1989Daniel Merle

At the end of the 1950s, Tato Bores began to become this iconic character in tail coat, cigar and thick glasses who analyzes the situation with humor, but without hesitation.. He started winning awards for his programs and transferred all that success to various revue shows at the Maipo Theater. broke audience records at key moments in Argentine history and has recorded through his well-known monologues most of the political processes of recent decades.

If anything stands out from Tato Bores’ gaze on the social, political and economic life of Argentina, it is the validity. The surprisingly topical feel of the usual issues of each of the decades, in the comedian’s voice. Also the names and surnames of some politicians, leaders, businessmen, judges: no one is safe in their monologues.

Tato Bores’ Historical Monologue No. 2000

In his 2000 monologue, written by screenwriter Santiago VarelaTato makes a traveled by 30 years from Argentinafrom 1960 to 1990. As Bores himself said before starting to run on the text: “30 years of putting scripts under this wig”.

Tato Bores’ Historical Monologue No. 2000

It’s the least circumstantial of his weekly monologues, but it’s one of the most remembered by his brilliant explanation of devaluation.

Tato Bores and the dollar

Already in 1962 Tato Bores warned on television on Argentina’s fascination with the dollar. “I think we all suddenly became financiers“, He said.

Tato Bores and the Dollar (1962)

“Notice that Before, when a guy had savings, he set up a small workshop, he opened a small factory, he bought a small field to raise chickens or plant tomatoes, which is what people do in poor countries. Instead, it’s different here. You walk down San Martín Street, where the exchange offices are, and the whole country stands in front of the blackboard“, describes Tato in reference to the houses of exchange which already seemed full at that time.

Tato Bores and the tax on the tax

Leafing through the pages of the newspaper, Tato Bores was struck by the news of a new tax and he hurried with a lesson on the tax system.

Tato Bores and the tax on the tax

So it’s a tax on tax. It would be like the guy who is about to steal and when he gets out they put him back in jail for being in jail. It’s like the story of the good pipe“, he assured.

Tato Bores talks about politicians, corruption, justice and friends of power

In 1993, Tato Bores dealt with a topic that was already on the agenda.a, Carlos Menem’s alleged candidacy for re-election.

(Source: YouTube)
(Source: YouTube)

“I’ve been saying the same things for 30 years, sinners change, but sins do not changehe says at the start of the monologue. “The mayors and councilors are different, but the canotas are the same. Ministers come and go, but corporate corruption“, phrasing.

Tato Bores devotes a monologue to Duhalde and De la Rúa

In the early 1990s, Tato Bores analyzed the political situation in the province of Buenos Aires and He spoke about the then vice-president Eduardo Duhalde and the deputy Fernando de la Rúawho was also president of the Radical Civic Union bloc in the lower house.

Tato Bores devotes a monologue to Duhalde and De la Rúa

“And I arrive at the office of my good friend, the vice-president Edward Duhalde, seated in an armchair surrounded by five hairdressers. And one with a tractor. He said to me, ‘Tato, don’t worry, they’re just making a cut for me.’ I say to him: ‘Yes, of course, with such a melon, five hairdressers and a tractor, it’s barely enough to remove the lint'”begins the monologue, with a clear reference to the size of the Banfield politician’s head.

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