This is how ground-based telescopes captured the incredible impact of the DART probe

This is how ground-based telescopes captured the incredible impact of the DART probe

It was the dramatic impact.
Image: ATLAS/Gizmodo project

The NASA’s DART missionwho crashed a kinetic impactor against a harmless asteroid, came out perfectly something that ended with the complete destruction of the spaceship as planned. and fromthey showed thes images obtained from Earth, the effects of the impact were nothing subtle.

The 500 kilo spacecraft crashed this Monday against Dimorphos, a small moon in orbit around the asteroid Didymos after of a 10-month trip to this system binary asteroid. The DRACO camera that went aboard the probe DART captured stunning first-person footage as it headed towards the asteroid at a speed of 22500 kilometers per hour.

The DRACO pictures of Dimorphos, an asteroid the size of the Colosseum, were sublime and revealed a soak surface of rocks and dust. DART was completely destroy following the impact. Scientists are now working to determine how this affected to run towards speed of the small moon and yes triggered a potential change in its orbital path around Didymos. A significant result would suggest scientists have stumbled upon a potential way to deflect dangerous asteroids. That yes, either Dimorphos and Didymos threaten our planet, neither before nor after this experience, it was almost a test to see if we could successfully move a space rock.

A view of the DART impact on Didymos, captured by the Virtual Telescope Project.

A view of the DART impact on Didymos, captured by the Virtual Telescope Project.
Image: Virtual Telescope Project

Telescopes around the world were pointing yesterday this system binary asteroid. At the start of the experience, I was not completely clear how visible could be the impact of the Earth, but the images we see clearly show an important column sticking out of Didymos.

“Es difícil comentar sobre la impresionante experiencia que vivimos anoche”, escribieron desde Pproject virtual telescope. “We saw in real time, with our own eyes, the effects of DART hitting its target asteroid Didymos, making it much brighter and increasing a huge cloud of debris. To monitor the impact, the Project virtual telescope, based in Italy, collaborated with the Klein Karoo Observatory of South Africa. “The target asteroid is visible in the bottom right of each image and is clearly developing a cloud of dust, which is expanding quite rapidly in the direction Eastto where the asteroid was moving,” prays the post office. Astronomers estimate that the dust cloud was expanding at a rate of 2.9 kilometers per second.

Impact picture.

Impact picture.
Image: Virtual Telescope Project

Astronomers from the ATLAS project also recorded the event. ATLAS is an early warning system for asteroid impact that has headquartered in Hawaii and is funded by NASA. “The oobservations of ATLAS from the DART spacecraft to Didymos! posted the account ATLAS on his Twitter. An accelerated timelapse shows the large moving impact column towards the binary asteroid system.

The South African Astronomical Observatory, captured a timelapse Similarly. Again you can see a feather crescent moving in the direction of the asteroid. It is important to point out that, more than 11 million kilometersthe pair of asteroids seem a unique object.

I’m amazed at the size of the penbut it is unclear whether the impact lifted a large amount of material or whether these views are only very dusty shimmering. Views of Dimorphos’ surface looked like a pile of rubble, suggesting it was a conglomerate of materials. If so, Dimorphos may have done massive damage to the asteroid, but we need more data to be sure. What we know isAt least that’s it DART produced a large dust cloud.

As to when we can know how I know altered the orbital path of Dimorphos, which could take anywhere from days to weeks. Whateverit will be an experience fascinating.

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